Sidlaws Gazetteer:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Introduction
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Back Drum (NO 336430, 287m)

English back + Gaelic druim, “ridge”
Location: west Denoon
Neighbours: Castleward (NE), Unnamed Point 315/2 (SW), Henderston Hill (S)
Hill Lists: Tump
Summit: tussock grass in forest firebreak
Notes: the name applies to the grassy ridge above Wester Denoon farm; the highest point is at the southwest end

Route 1

Kinpurney Hill from summit of Back Drum
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Kinpurney Hill (with tower) from summit of Back Drum
Back Drum and Kinpurney Hill from Castleward
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Back Drum from Castleward, with Kinpurney Hill in the background (with tower)
Back Drum ridge
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Looking along the ridge of Back Drum from near Castleward

Balkeerie Hill (NO 339443)

Gaelic baile ceathar, “town of quarter-share”
Hill slope, NW of Castleward, above Balkeerie farm

Balkeerie Hill from Balkeerie
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Balkeerie Hill from Balkeerie; summit of Castleward is on the sky-line, and East Nevay Hill is the slope to right of frame

Balkello Hill (NO 361394, 397m)

Gaelic baile coille “woodland farm”
Location: main ridge, east central
Neighbours: Auchterhouse Hill (NW), Craigowl Hill (NE), Unnamed Point 328 (N)
Hill Lists: Tump
Summit: moorland; Sydney Scroggie view indicator, cairn
Notes: above Balkello Farm; often called Balluderon Hill (and so named on the Sydney Scroggie view indicator) but the Ordnance Survey attach the name Balluderon to the west ridge of Craigowl Hill; the view indicator is often referred to as the Sydney Scroggie “memorial”, but Scroggie was both alive and present when the indicator was officially unveiled in 2000

Route 1; Route 2

Summit of Balkello Hill, looking towards Auchterhouse Hill
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Summit of Balkello Hill, looking past the view indicator to Auchterhouse Hill
Syd Scroggie memorial plaque, Balkello/Balluderon Hill
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The inscription on the Syd Scroggie tribute plaque, calling the hill Balluderon Hill
Balkello Hill from Unnamed Point 328
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Balkello Hill from Unnamed Point 328
Auchterhouse, Balkello and Craigowl hills from Muirhead
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Auchterhouse Hill (left), Balkello Hill (centre) and Craigowl (right) from Muirhead

Ballo Hill (NO 263351, 301m)

Gaelic bealach, “pass”; perhaps the pass at Tullybaccart, which it overlooks to its east, but the name associates it with the minor pass of Ballo Glack, to the west, overlooked by Northballo Hill and Southballo Hill
Location: main ridge, west
Neighbours: Hill of Dores (N), Northballo Hill (NW), Southballo Hill (SW), Unnamed Point 273 (E)
Summit: pasture; communication mast with building and fenced enclosure
Notes: above Little Ballo farm

Route 1; Route 2

Ballo Hill
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Summit of Ballo Hill
Strathmore from Ballo Hill
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Strathmore from Ballo Hill

Balluderon Hill (NO 372396)

Emphasis on the second syllable; Gaelic baile ladharan, “farm of the little tooth or claw”
Hill slope, west ridge of Craigowl Hill
Notes: above farms of North and South Balluderon; name often applied to Balkello Hill

Craigowl from Auchterhouse Hill
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In this view of Craigowl from Auchterhouse Hill, Balluderon Hill is the hill slope to the right of the summit

Balshando Hill (NO 278355, 266m)

Gaelic baile sean dabhach, “farm of the old davoch” (a davoch was about 400 acres of ploughed land)
Location: outlier, west
Neighbours: Blacklaw Hill (SE), Unnamed Point 273 (SW)
Hill Lists: Tump
Summit: rough grass
Notes: near Balshando Farm; surrounded by Naiad Wood, which is much overgrown; a row of wildfowl hides along the west side (at the foot of Whinny Knowe), overlooks Lochindores Loch

Route 1

Auchterhouse Hill and Craigowl from Balshando Hill
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View from summit of Balshando Hill towards Auchterhouse Hill and Craigowl
Balshando Hill from Whinny Knowe
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Balshando Hill from Whinny Knowe
Wildfowl hide on west side of Balshando Hill
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Wildfowl hide on the west side of Balshando Hill

Bandirran Hill (NO 203314, 275m)

Gaelic baile an deoradh “stead of the dewar” (a dewar was the hereditary guardian of a saint’s relics)
Location: main ridge, west
Neighbours: Dunsinane Hill (E)
Hill Lists: Tump
Summit: rough grass; triangulation pillar overgrown with whin bushes
Notes: above mansion house of Bandirran and Bandirran farm; traversed by remains of the School Road, linking Bandirran with the school at Kirkton of Collace; telecommunication mast on north slope

Route 1

King's Seat and Dunsinane Hill from Bandirran Hill
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From the summit of Bandirran Hill, looking across The Cape to Dunsinane Hill (with quarry) and Black Hill; King’s Seat is the triangular hill in the distance, over the left shoulder of Black Hill
Trig point, Bandirran Hill
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The overgrown triangulation pillar on Bandirran Hill
The School Road on Bindirran Hill
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Bandirran Hill from Kirkton of Collace, looking along the line of the School Road

Berry Hillock (NO 371443, c280m)

English, as written
Location: Denoon/Ogilvie
Neighbours: Carlunie Hill (SW)
Summit: rough grazing; small cairn, triangulation pillar at NO 372444 (282m) NE of summit
Notes: above Berryhillock farm, which may be the source of the name

Route 1

Carlunie Hill from Berry Hillock
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The summit of Berry Hillock seen from the triangulation pillar; Carlunie Hill on left and wind turbines of Ark Hill on right
Berry Hillock from A928
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Berry Hillock from the east
Glen Ogilvie from Craigowl
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Looking down Glen Ogilvie from Craigowl; the ridge from Carlunie Hill to Berry Hillock is snow-covered on the right

Black Hill (NO 219319, 360m)

English, as written, for its dark heather cover
Location: main ridge, west
Neighbours: Dunsinane Hill (SW), King’s Seat (NE)
Hill Lists: Tump
Summit: heather; cairn

Route 1; Route 2

King's Seat from Black Hill
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Summit of Black Hill, King’s Seat in the distance
Black Hill and Dunsinane Hill from north
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Black Hill (left), showing its dark heather cover; Dunsinane Hill is on the right
Crags of Black Hill from Dunsinane Hill
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Crags of Black Hill from Dunsinane Hill

Blacklaw Hill (NO 288344, 284m)

English black, for its dark heather cover + Scots law, an isolated, conical hill (the “Hill” is therefore redundant)
Location: outlier, west
Neighbours: Balshando Hill (NW), Unnamed Point 273 (W), White Hill (SW)
Hill Lists: Tump
Summit: moorland, dissected by multiple quad bike tracks that reach all the way to the triangulation pillar

Route 1; Route 2

Dundee & Tay estuary from Blacklaw Hill
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Summit of Blacklaw Hill, with quad bike track and view of Dundee and the Tay Estuary
Piperdam Loch and Blacklaw Hill
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Blacklaw Hill, showing its dark heather cover, from Unnamed Point 273; Piperdam Loch is in the distance
Blacklaw Hill from the west
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Blacklaw Hill and quad bike tracks, from Unnamed Point 273

Bowhouse Hill (NO 306374, 265m)

Pronounced as in “taking a bow”, not “bow and arrow”. Scots bow “herd of cattle” + English house, meaning a byre or cattleshed
Location: outlier, west central
Neighbours: West Mains Hill (E)
Summit: moorland
Notes: above Bowhouse farm

Route 1

Lundie Craigs from Bowhouse Hill
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Summit of Bowhouse Hill, looking towards Lundie Craigs
Bowhouse Hill from the south
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Bowhouse Hill from the south
Trig point of West Mains Hill
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Looking west from the summit of West Mains Hill, Bowhouse Hill is the low grassy eminence in the middle distance near left of frame

Broom Hill (NO 382421, c290m)

English, as written, referring to broom plants
Location: east Ogilvie
Neighbours: Gallow Hill (SE), Laidloon Hill (E)
Summit: moorland

Route 1; Route 2

Ark Hill and Carlunie Hill from Broom Hill
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Summit of Broom Hill, looking across Glen Ogilvie to Ark Hill (left, with wind turbines) and Carlunie Hill (right)
Broom Hill ridge from Gallow Hill
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Broom Hill from the slopes of Gallow Hill; beyond are Glen Ogilvie and the Ark HillBerry Hillock ridge
Gallow Hill and Broom Hill from Glen Ogilvie
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Broom Hill (right) and Gallow Hill (left, with mast) from Glen Ogilvie
Glen Ogilvie from Craigowl
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Looking down Glen Ogilvie from Craigowl; the ridge of Carlunie Hill and Berry Hillock is snow-covered on left, Broom Hill snow-covered on extreme right

Broom Hills (NO 260340, c205m)

English, as written, referring to broom plants
Location: outlier, west
Neighbours: White Hill (E), Southballo Hill (NW)
Summit: dense forestry plantation
Notes: an undulating summit is embedded in a patch of new forestry between two fields

Summit of Broom Hills
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The several summits of Broom Hills have been planted with forestry

Buttergask Hill (NO 230340, 307m)

Gaelic bothar, “road” + gasg “tail of land”, meaning a ridgeway
Location: main ridge, west
Neighbours: Round Law (SSE), King’s Seat (S), Lintrose Hill (W)
Hill Lists:Tump
Summit: moorland; two tops, the easterly one being the higher, marked by a small cairn
Notes: above farms at West Buttergask and Over Buttergask

Route 1; Route 2

Lintrose Hill from Buttergask Hill
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The summit of Buttergask Hill, looking towards Lintrose Hill
Buttergask Hill
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The two summits of Buttergask Hill, seen from King’s Seat

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Introduction
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A discursive blog on various topics of minor interest